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Kansas Nebraska PART ONE  
Due Date: 4/6/2017
Subject: U.S. History 10 HR

Wednesday’s Assignment

You will have TWO assignments to work on in class. These assignments will be completed individually. No Group Work allowed.  This is a LOT OF WORK AND WILL BE COMPLETED OVER A TWO DAY TIME PERIOD IN THE LIBRARY.

PART ONE:

Activity 1. The Kansas–Nebraska Act:

By 1854, the United States had fulfilled its "manifest destiny" of occupying the entire geographical expanse from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans. The rapid settlement of the West raised to a new level of intensity the persistent question of whether or not to permit slavery to extend into the new territories.

In this activity, you will be given an interactive map of the United States in 1820 and 1854; you will contrast how the country has changed from that time.

Map of 1820 (copy link into web browser)

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/static/neh/interactives/sectionalism/lesson1/

 

Map of 1854 (copy link into web browser)

http://teachingamericanhistory.org/static/neh/interactives/sectionalism/lesson3/

 

Map Handout- Write your answers in a word document and print or copy your answers on your own sheet of paper. Number each Activity.

 

https://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/map_analysis.pdf

 

Yes, you will answer ALL questions to the chart!!!

 

 

Activity 2. The Kansas–Nebraska Act:

The Kansas–Nebraska Act of 1854 shattered whatever peace was gained by the Compromise of 1850. In addition to organizing the U.S. Territories of Kansas and Nebraska, the act attempted to deal with the extension of slavery into this region by allowing the settlers in each territory to decide the question for themselves. U. S. Senator Stephen Douglas, who championed this policy of popular sovereignty and included it in the Kansas–Nebraska Act, unwittingly set off a firestorm of protest among those committed to stopping the spread of slavery. One such person was former Congressman Abraham Lincoln, who strongly opposed any policy that could extend slavery into the territories.

 

Your task is to go on-line to the websites for the speeches by Douglas and Lincoln. In the worksheet (s) you will answer the questions for each speech.

Today only answer the KANSAS- NEBRASKA QUESTIONS

Here is the speech and questions in the chart (copy and paste link into web browser)

https://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/Kans_Neb_Debate.pdf

 

Today, you will only read and research info on one more activity:

-       Excerpts from the Kansas-Nebraska Act, May 30, 1854

Yes, you will answer ALL questions to the chart!!!

 

                           STOP FOR TODAY!!

                        

                                                  


Kansas Nebraska PART TWO  
Due Date: 4/6/2017
Subject: U.S. History 10 HR

                                                    

PART TWO

  THURSDAY's ASSIGNMENT

 

Make sure you have completed yesterday's assignment: Maps and Kansas Nebraska ACT EXCERPT before starting today's work.

 

THEN

Using the same link from the conclusion of yesterday’s work, you will read and research info on QUESTIONS REGARDING THE LINCOLN AND DOUGLAS DEBATE:

Here is the speech and questions to the chart (copy and paste link into web browser)

 

https://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/worksheets/Kans_Neb_Debate.pdf

 

-       Stephen Douglas

-       Lincoln

  

After everyone has completed this work…..

We will report back to the class to start drafting up the debate.                                            

 

 

Activity 3: Debate

This will begin after you have answered the questions to the link above. You will divide yourselves into three groups:

  • Group A      will represent Douglas's viewpoint;
  • Group B      will represent Lincoln's viewpoint.

Both groups will meet together to compare their answers and craft the best possible argument for their side of the mini-debate. Each group appoints one or two students to advance the argument.

  • Group C      will evaluate the two arguments.

While Groups A and B are working on their arguments, Group C will collaborate and make a list of the main points of each side of the argument that they will listen for during the debate. A graphic organizer for listing the main points is PAGE 10 on the above website. You will need to complete this as a group. After the debate is over, Group C also will give the class strong points made by each side and, if desired, declares the winner of the debate as determined by a vote taken within the group.


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